Fake it till you make it

March 7, 2014

This show was pivotal. This was the first time in my music ‘career’ that I actually felt like a rock star. In my previous shows with Geppetto I had made an effort to look and act like a star (not being a snob, but engaging the crowd more), but I still didn’t know how to move and hold myself on stage. Despite hearing “you look comfortable up there” I still felt awkward.

The night began with The Mailbox Order, a young rockin’ punk band who looked like they were still in high school. The audience was made up of teen friends and parents. Everyone was standing still while the energetic rockers played their hearts out. Being a performer myself I know what it feels like to have what looks like an uninterested yet obligated crowd attend. It feels really awkward to be honest getting no response from people.

B-ROD, KCEXX and I went up to the stage and got all excited. We jumped, reached for the band and then began to mosh. Then, one by one some of the younger folks joined in and the band suddenly had a real audience.

This energy went on for the rest of the night as The Feros Project, Sektau, and Save the World get the girl took the stage. All the bands were very talented and I suggest you find them on Facebook, the whole night was a blast. The time came for us to take the stage. This time I wasn’t at all nervous. I felt like I knew this crowd, they liked moshing, jumping and rocking.

We began to play and I focused on looking how a rock star looks on stage, instead of just standing there and being boring. It wasn’t long before they started to mosh. I don’t know if they were moshing out of courtesy because we moshed for them, or if they did it because they just wanted to. As we went from the outright punk songs to the harder slower rock they kept up their energy.

   

As B-ROD began to solo they gravitated to him. When I told them to clap, they clapped. When I told them to do a circle pit, they did it.

When our set was over a few people wanted to take pictures with me, and then a handful more came up to compliment us on our show. It was awesome.

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Welcome to Mojo’s

                “It sounds like we’re gonna headline at Mojo’s on the 27th!” I told Ry’lee excitedly. “Wait, the 27th as in a few days from now?” “No no, not till January 27th” I clarified. “Isn’t Mojo’s like a high school hang out for the Ogden kids?” She asked. “Uh… I don’t know, I’ve never been there.” I said.

                A few days later, on December 27th I got a text from Kevin “Yeah there was some confusion. Ron meant tonight. Never mind” “So… no show?” I asked. “Unless everyone can” he added. It wasn’t much longer before everyone was last minute planning for the show. We were headlining, which means we were the most popular band playing at the show. It only really means something if you’re a huge band anyways.

                Honestly I was more nervous for this show than the first one we did. We hadn’t even gotten the whole band together since the last show. December is a tough month for small bands, and I would guess all bands. I ran through lyrics in my head to make sure I was still solid. We had almost no time to invite our own people so I was preparing to sing for people I didn’t know. Luckily we were the last band to play that night so we had a little extra time after work to prepare.

                When we got there we went straight to the back of the building. I felt legit. There were people moving equipment in and others moving equipment out. The building was small, and had writing and stickers all over the walls from many bands who had come through there. The bathroom was dirty and looked like your stereotypical 7-11 or concert venue bathroom. There was a younger woman sitting by the hall that connected ‘backstage’ to the main area. I could get used to this sorta thing. I was pumped.

                I walked into the area where the stage was and finally saw how small the hang out actually was. The band before us sounded like every other screaming band that’s been playing these local shows lately. Despite my thinking we sounded like a lot of other rock bands out there, I feel like we’re the only local band that doesn’t scream. Watch, now at our next show we’re gonna be just like everyone else.

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                The time came; we set up the gear and did our sound check. By now there were about twenty, maybe thirty, people. A few high schoolers who show up all the time and some people my girlfriend invited. We began to play and most everyone was standing or sitting, no moshing. There was one kid though who kept pacing back and forth like he had some weird disorder. We did a few of our slower songs, which I didn’t exactly expect much moshing, but when we played Don’t Give Up I actually thought there would be moshing. Instead the one kid paced a little quicker as if agitated with a phone conversation.

                After the 25-30 minute set we had pre prepared both us and the crowd felt like we should play more, but there wasn’t much more that we as a full group had prepared. The high school kids requested a few songs, a few members from the band knew some but not quite all of us did. This was the part that made me feel the need to write more songs and probably prepare a few more covers.

                The night came to an end and most the people had left. I loved it.